Your guide to the district of Maldon and its history
 

Maldon is a town on the Blackwater estuary in Essex, England and is the seat of the Maldon district which includes the starting point of the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation at Heybridge Basin.
PROMENADE PARK
This park has been a summer haven for generations of families living in or visiting Maldon and is now especially popular with the splash park
HYTHE QUAY
Ajacent to Promenade Park and home to many of the surviving Thames barges. This old port is now a great attraction for visitors and locals
BEELEIGH
Where the Rivers Chelmer and Blackwater converge at the start of the man made cut of the Navigation. This area is also home to Beeleigh Abbey and mill
HEYBRIDGE BASIN
Located at the sea end of the Chelmer and Blackwater navigation, the Basin contains many resident and visiting craft. A good starting point for walks along the sea walls

Maldon Museum
Located by the gates of Promenade Park it houses a large collection of displays depicting the history of Maldon

Museum of Power Langford
The old water pumping station exhibits includes working examples of power sources of all types and chronicles the major roles that they have played in history

Combined Military Services Museum
Huge range of exhibits conveying the history of warfare and weapons from the middle ages to the present day

 
The Railway to Maldon
Opened in 1848 and finally closed in 1964. The story of the Witham to Maldon railway
Beeleigh Abbey
Beeleigh Abbeywas contructed in 1180 on land granted to the Canons by Robert Mantell
E H Bentall & Co
From a plough designed by a farmer to once the main industry in Heybridge
All Saints Church Maldon
Beckingham Hall, Tolleshunt Major
Beeleigh Mill
Dr Thomas Plume and the Library
Edward Bright - the fat man of Maldon
St Marys Church, Maldon
The Langford Pumping Station
The Bentall Car
Maldon in 1818

Medieval Maldon
Maldon is not one of England's better known medieval towns. It was not a major player during the period when medieval urbanization is best documented, its importance lying in a mistier period of the Middle Ages, and consequently little attention has been paid it by historians. Yet, as a town relatively late in maturing, it provides an interesting comparison to larger towns. Read the History of Medieval Maldon by Stephen Alsford here

Battle of Maldon links:
battleofmaldon.org.uk
airflow.net/maldon

 
 

Maldon is an ancient Royal Charter town with its centre situated on a hill close to the confluence of the rivers Chelmer and Blackwater.

Maldon was an early Saxon settlement and was known as Maeldune, a monument on a hill. In 916, King Edward the Elder fortified the Borough against the assaults and in 991 the famous Battle of Maldon took place on the outskirts of the town near the causeway to Northey Island. A large force of Vikings sailed up the Blackwater and camped on Northey Island and the famous Battle of Maldon ensued.

A Saxon town of some importance, Maldon became even more so in Norman times and was granted a Royal Charter in 1171 by Henry II. A copy of this Charter hangs on the old Moot Hall in the High Street alongside many other important documents and paintings.

Near to the Moot Hall is the ancient church of All Saints which has been dominating the scene since the thirteenth century. A feature of the church is the triangular tower which is unique in England.

 
 
 
All Information on these pages has been compiled from information from third parties and which may be subject to change or cancellation. As we cannot be held responsible for any errors or inaccuracies you are advised to confirm details with the various organisers before embarking on a long journey
 
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